Building a Shape Arcade – Part 2

Updates

After experimenting with the smaller prototype (to my right in the picture above), I realized that I needed to make things bigger to get the range of motion I want from the final piece.

I followed the excellent tutorial by TobiasPi (http://www.instructables.com/id/Mini-Pi-Powered-Arcade-Machine/) to quickly prototype a larger test bed with cardboard. This way I can quickly add lights and motors while I finalize my design specifications and changes to the design found in the tutorial.

As you can tell from the photo, I’m pretty excited about this!

Updates

Building a Shape Arcade

After experimenting with the smaller prototype on the right, I realized that I needed to make things bigger to get the range of motion I want from the final piece.

I followed the excellent tutorial by TobiasPi (http://www.instructables.com/id/Mini-Pi-Powered-Arcade-Machine/) to quickly prototype a larger test bed with cardboard. This way I can quickly add lights and motors while I finalize my design specifications and changes to the design found in the tutorial.

As you can tell from the photo, I’m pretty excited about this!

Building a Shape Arcade – Part 1

Updates

This is an early prototype of the arcade cabinet that I’m using to test the shape while I collect the components for a larger enclosure. I’ve moved the connections from a breadboard to a prototyping shield, and can use a small display in the slot if needed.

The current plan is to design a cabinet to be laser cut, and add a strip of NeoPixels to match the player’s color. I may then add an additional servo motor or two depending on whether or not I can provide enough power to the Arduino.

I’ve also managed to get openFrameworks up and running on a raspberry pi, which will be the platform that runs the actual arcade when it’s finalized.

Stay tuned for more later this week!

Building an Alternative Controller part 7

Updates

I managed to get the Bluetooth module working, and improved the issue where the shape would jump around the screen by sending a check byte to the program set to 255. By then making sure that neither potentiometer sent 255, I could use that first number to make sure that the game was reading a “complete” message.

Upon further testing with my classmates, the overwhelming feedback was to make this more of an arcade experience than a controller experience.

So I’ll be tabling the Bluetooth function in favor of building a small arcade cabinet that has reactive elements (like colored lights that match the player, and maybe some servos moving shapes on the exterior).

Building an Alternative Controller part 6

Updates

I’ve finished developing an early version of the game itself over the past week, and today I got to test it with some friends with an improved circuit prototype!

Its pretty fun 🙂

Next steps are to solve the amount of noise present with serial communication over Bluetooth, solder components to the prototype shield, decide upon a final circuit board design for use in the final product, and to begin iterating upon external designs.

Building an Alternative Controller part 5

Updates

Success! I was able to transmit the same serial data over Bluetooth using an HC-06 module with minimal changes to the code.

Because it is a bit buggy, I will have to experiment with the amount of delay and how the code is interpreted in openFrameworks to make it smoother. The only real change was with mapping the values.

Because the HC-06 only accepts a 3.3V power connection, it reduces the range of the potentiometers that I have. I kept only receiving maximum values of 169.

Which if you multiply by 1.5 you get 255. So by multiplying 255 by 1.5 to get 383 and mapping to that value, I’m able to get a more accurate range of data to send to openFrameworks.

Next steps are to Prototype the game experience with keyboard controls, and to invest in better potentiometers. Next version should be breadboardless as I move closer to finalizing a circuit board design.

Space Jam: Prototyping Spatial Games in London

Updates

We’re a bunch of graduate students at Goldsmiths, University of London who spent an afternoon along the Thames prototyping spatial games with what we found along the way. Included are clips of our food exchange game, musical chairs (by swing!), and “the Tate Game.” Link to a writeup to come soon.

Credits: Alex Fletcher, Benjamin Tandy, Doruk Hasdogan, Ece Hasdogan, Hugh Kennedy, Julia Makivic, Matthew Deline, Tommy Graven, Wichaya (Billy) Karnchanapee